January Meeting Announcement

Please join us Fri­day, Jan­u­ary 22nd, 2016 at 7:00pm in Room 132 of the Archae­ol­o­gy Build­ing for our first speak­er of 2016.  The Saska­toon Archae­o­log­i­cal Soci­ety is pleased to announce that Kay Jol­ly­more (Depart­ment of Archae­ol­o­gy & Anthro­pol­o­gy, Uni­ver­si­ty of Saskatchewan) will be speak­ing on her Master’s research, “Stone Cir­cle Inves­ti­ga­tions at a Hyper-Saline Lake in Saskatchewan”.  All are wel­come to attend!

Kay Jol­ly­more is a sec­ond year Mas­ter of Arts can­di­date in archae­ol­o­gy at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Saskatchewan. She grew up in cen­tral British Colum­bia in the small gold rush town of Horse­fly and received her under­grad­u­ate degree in archae­ol­o­gy at Simon Fras­er Uni­ver­si­ty in 2001. She has worked in col­lec­tions man­age­ment at the Van­cou­ver Mar­itime Muse­um, as a research coor­di­na­tor for a BC First Nations group and most recent­ly for nine years as a pro­fes­sion­al archae­ol­o­gist in British Colum­bia, Nunavut, and Saskatchewan with ERM Con­sul­tants (cur­rent­ly on leave of absence to pur­sue her MA). Kay’s past work in Saskatchewan inspired her to pur­sue an MA with a focus in pre­his­toric plains archae­ol­o­gy. Her MA research focus­es on pre­his­toric stone cir­cle sites in south-cen­tral Saskatchewan, super­vised by Drs. Mar­garet Kennedy and Glenn Stu­art.

Abstract: Stone Cir­cle Inves­ti­ga­tions at a Hyper-Saline Lake in Saskatchewan
This talk will focus on aspects of Kay Jollymore’s MA research car­ried out this past sum­mer at Lit­tle Man­i­tou Lake in south-cen­tral Saskatchewan. The lake has his­tor­i­cal­ly been sug­gest­ed to pos­sess heal­ing prop­er­ties due to its min­er­al char­ac­ter­is­tics. Today Lit­tle Man­i­tou Lake is known to be a hyper-saline lake, how­ev­er, research car­ried out on lake sed­i­ments sug­gests that pri­or to 2,000 years ago it was fresh­wa­ter in nature. Thus, an impor­tant research goal has been to estab­lish the date(s) of occu­pa­tion for sites adja­cent to the lake to deter­mine if they relate to the fresh­wa­ter or saline char­ac­ter­is­tics of the lake. Some of the tech­niques employed and pre­lim­i­nary find­ings of the 2015 field­work will be sum­ma­rized.