February Meeting Announcement


Join us on Fri­day, Feb­ru­ary 8th at 7:00 pm in Room 132 of the Archae­ol­o­gy Build­ing (55 Cam­pus Dri­ve) for our next meet­ing! Cara Pol­lio (West­ern Her­itage) will be pre­sent­ing on “Archae­o­log­i­cal Inves­ti­ga­tions at the No. 39 Swift Cur­rent Fly­ing Train­ing Ser­vices School”. All are wel­come!

Abstract: Archae­o­log­i­cal Inves­ti­ga­tions at the No. 39 Swift Cur­rent Fly­ing Train­ing Ser­vices School
The Swift Cur­rent Muse­um is inves­ti­gat­ing a report­ed buried pit asso­ci­at­ed with the dis­pos­al of World War II era mate­ri­als from the No. 39 Swift Cur­rent Fly­ing Train­ing Ser­vices School (S.F.T.S.). In 2015, the Swift Cur­rent Muse­um con­tract­ed West­ern Her­itage to com­plete a near sur­face geo­phys­i­cal sur­vey (NGS), using Ground Pen­e­trat­ing Radar (GPR) and mag­ne­tom­e­try, of cer­tain areas of the present-day Swift Cur­rent Air­base, where the pit was thought to be locat­ed. The NGS result­ed in the iden­ti­fi­ca­tion of sev­er­al anom­alies that were flagged for inves­ti­ga­tion. Three trench­es were exca­vat­ed in 2016 to inves­ti­gate the anom­alies. The trench­es revealed strati­graph­ic infor­ma­tion about the site and pro­duced mul­ti­ple diag­nos­tic his­toric arti­facts. The pre­sen­ta­tion, will review the project con­text, the results of the NGS and trench­ing work, and the arti­fact analy­sis of the col­lect­ed mate­ri­als from the trench­ing and ground sur­face col­lec­tion.

Biog­ra­phy:
Cara Pol­lio is a con­sult­ing archae­ol­o­gist work­ing for West­ern Her­itage out of Regi­na. She has 15 years of archae­o­log­i­cal expe­ri­ence work­ing exten­sive­ly in Saskatchewan, Alber­ta, and Man­i­to­ba. She has worked with pub­lic non-prof­it orga­ni­za­tions, uni­ver­si­ty field schools, provin­cial gov­ern­ment agen­cies, and var­i­ous petro­le­um, min­ing, and forestry com­pa­nies and has expe­ri­ence in all of the geo­graph­ic regions (espe­cial­ly the plains, park­land, and bore­al for­est) of Saskatchewan, Alber­ta, and Man­i­to­ba. Her areas of exper­tise are archae­o­log­i­cal con­sul­ta­tion for indus­try and zooar­chae­ol­o­gy with a spe­cif­ic focus on Cana­di­an his­toric and pre-con­tact fau­nal analy­sis. Her MA the­sis (U of S) was a Scan­ning Elec­tron Micro­scope study of cut marks on bison remains from Fish Creek park in Cal­gary.

January Meeting Announcement


Join us on Fri­day, Jan­u­ary 11th at 7:00 pm in Room 132 of the Archae­ol­o­gy Build­ing (55 Cam­pus Dri­ve) for the first lec­ture of 2019! Angela Burant and Olen­ka Kaw­chuk (Depart­ment of Archae­ol­o­gy and Anthro­pol­o­gy, Uni­ver­si­ty of Saskatchewan) will be pre­sent­ing “shíshálh Archae­o­log­i­cal Research Project: An Expe­ri­ence in Com­mu­ni­ty Archae­ol­o­gy”. All are wel­come!

Abstract: shíshálh Archae­o­log­i­cal Research Project: An Expe­ri­ence in Com­mu­ni­ty Archae­ol­o­gy
Oper­at­ing since 2008, the shíshálh Archae­o­log­i­cal Research Project (sARP) is a col­lab­o­ra­tion between researchers at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Saskatchewan and the shíshálh nation, which recent­ly signed a land­mark rec­on­cil­i­a­tion agree­ment with the gov­ern­ment of British Colum­bia. Direct­ed by Dr. Ter­ence Clark, the project works close­ly with mem­bers of the com­mu­ni­ty to inves­ti­gate long-term pat­terns of land and resource use with­in shíshálh lands. A pri­ma­ry aim of the project is to increase knowl­edge of shíshálh cul­ture his­to­ry with­in the com­mu­ni­ty itself, as well as with­in the broad­er dis­course of the region. Last sum­mer, sARP offered a field school through the Uni­ver­si­ty of Saskatchewan for the first time.

Under­grad­u­ate stu­dents had the oppor­tu­ni­ty to gain expe­ri­ence in sur­vey, exca­va­tion, and pub­lic out­reach all while study­ing the cul­ture his­to­ry of the Coast Sal­ish region of British Colum­bia. The field school encour­aged com­mu­ni­ty involve­ment and rela­tion­ship build­ing between stu­dents and com­mu­ni­ty mem­bers, two cen­tral pil­lars of com­mu­ni­ty archae­ol­o­gy. sARP and this field school rep­re­sent impor­tant steps toward wide­spread col­lab­o­ra­tion between archae­ol­o­gists and Indige­nous com­mu­ni­ties.

Biog­ra­phy:
Angela Burant is a fourth year archae­ol­o­gy stu­dent at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Saskatchewan. She is inter­est­ed in house­hold archae­ol­o­gy and plans to do her mas­ters under Dr. Ter­ence Clark on sites in shíshálh lands of British Colum­bia. Angela vol­un­teers at the Saskatchewan Archae­o­log­i­cal Soci­ety and is an exec­u­tive mem­ber of the Saska­toon Archae­o­log­i­cal Soci­ety. She is also the Vice Pres­i­dent of the Archae­ol­o­gy and Anthro­pol­o­gy Stu­dents’ Asso­ci­a­tion.

Olen­ka Kaw­chuk is also an archae­ol­o­gy stu­dent in her fourth year at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Saskatchewan. Her areas of inter­est include com­mu­ni­ty archae­ol­o­gy, mor­tu­ary archae­ol­o­gy, and pub­lic archae­ol­o­gy. She plans to pur­sue her master’s degree under the super­vi­sion of Dr. Ter­ence Clark work­ing with the Nation­al Cen­tre for Truth and Rec­on­cil­i­a­tion to locate miss­ing grave  at Cana­di­an Res­i­den­tial Schools. She is also the cur­rent trea­sur­er of the Archae­ol­o­gy and Anthro­pol­o­gy Stu­dents’ Asso­ci­a­tion.